By this standard, Jeremy Rifkin’s. We want the best for others and the world. Will that "post-Capitalism" led to the Share Economy or, as Rifkin calls it, to the Collaborative Common Economy is quite possible but not yet certain. The Energy Internet is becoming a reality. Rifkin draws from the company of elite intellectual circles, and espouses a utopian vision of our near future. In the last fifty years, factories have grown into gigantic organizations and are controlled by a few wealthy people. For instance, if there’s a heat wave and people are using their air conditioning units a lot, then the phone might suggest to short out the rinsing cycle on your washing machine to conserve energy. There’s an old joke about doctors. Once these goods are used, they become unavailable for other uses. It’s also the birthplace of new economy in which people can be more involved with their interests and passions, rather than being mere consumers. A trend is occurring where people are being replaced by machines. Are you spending this season bundling up against the chill or enjoying summery southern hemisphere vibes (in which case we are... To see what your friends thought of this book, I didn't reach the end, but I've just changed the status from "reading" to "read" to make the fact that I've stopped reading it official. I didn't reach the end, but I've just changed the status from "reading" to "read" to make the fact that I've stopped reading it official. Reading this while on the verge of looking for a job after taking some time off might not have been the right move. You saved another human a long review. Everyone needs some kind of intellectual framework to navigate this tricky tension, which is where futurists come in––they synthesize data, make observations, and construct arguments for why we should think one way or another about what’s to come. Here, the trajectory of modern technology can seemingly only lead to good things. Reposted from the Integral Post-Metaphysical Spirituality blog with permisson of the author Review of Jeremy Rifkin's "The Zero Marginal Cost Society" Edward Berge. The problem is that goods are transported to warehouses far away from their destinations, which increases the cost of shipping. Even though they have a lot of knowledge, computers will eventually be able to replace them as well. Read a quick 1-Page Summary, a Full Summary, or watch video summaries curated by our expert team. He is no. But in the future, sharing will be the norm because it’s collaborative. It will change our economy, as our economy has changed by each earlier innovation: from feudalism to capitalism, and now to a new economy in which capitalism is pushed to the sidelines. A skilled writer really could have conveye. In creating this beautiful object, you’ve wasted energy because there isn’t enough of it on Earth to produce things like pianos all the time. As the title suggests, we're moving beyond capitalism/communism and into something more interesting as prices plummet for many life essentials. One way to begin would be by looking at warehouses and distribution centers. In short, an important and compelling read. All these changes were accompanied by innovations in the availability of energy (agriculture, wind power, steam power, gasoline, elektricity) and in communication (the written word, the printing press, the telegram, the telephone etc). In addition, the Communication Internet is part of a larger set of interconnecting internets that help us do business and make money. The current logistics system is inefficient. This highlights an inherent problem in capitalism: companies want to grow as much as possible and don’t think about how they’re using resources like wood or metal when making products such as pianos. While he lays out detailed analyses to support his reasoning -- I was still hungry for more consideration of some of the greatest challenges facing our 21st-century globalised society (climate change, food and water security, etc.). The first front is economic where the capitalist economic paradigm is giving way to collaborative commons because the marginal cost of producing goods is fast approachin. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Excellent analysis of the situation I've been following for a while: what happens to capitalism once technology has demonetized everything? 'Many' is not the same as 'everyone' and capitalistic endeavours have taken toll on nature. One has to just ask wheth. In other words, these companies may end up hurting themselves! Read the world’s #1 book summary of The Zero Marginal Cost Society by Jeremy Rifkin here. beings that are assumed to love the money-powered systems of capitalism. Economic activity works against the tendency of nature toward disorder by creating ordered objects out of component parts that would otherwise just be lying in a chaotic heap on the ground. Now that the marginal cost of books is very low, your production costs have also declined. Energy is present in all objects. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Human beings are not the egotistical, 'always out for nr 1.' THE ZERO MARGINAL COST SOCIETY: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism by Jeremy Rifkin, Plagrave-MacMillan, 2014 This is a result of the new way we live our lives—collaboration and decentralization. For example, if you run a printing press, then each book you print incurs certain costs – materials, utilities, labor and so on – which are added to the cost of any other books you print. In the United States, for example, there are trucks that travel around with only 60 percent of their cargo filled. BOOK REVIEW: 'The Zero Marginal Cost Society': Welcome to the Brave New Workerless World. Moreover, hobbyists share their expertise and tutor each other for free on how to use 3D printers which further reduces the cost of using them. We’d love your help. We have to ask ourselves, “How will this affect our society?” There’s a fine line between automating jobs and over-automating them. It promises that products and services will enhance a person’s personality and identity and make him or her more appealing,”, “The democratization of manufacturing means that anyone and eventually everyone can access the means of production, making the question of who should own and control the means of production irrelevant, and capitalism along with it.”, Corruption, Plutocracy, Oligarchy, Kleptocracy, Corporatocracy — Solutions: Reasoning & Alternatives, Mario the lone bookwolf (semi reviewing hiatus ), Heat Up the Holidays with These 27 Winter Romances. Climate change issues are also briefly mentioned, but as the poorest people of the world become included in all the sharing, the birth rate will become more sustainable and those of us who eat too much will realize that we will be happier consuming less food and fewer material products. I learned about the Enclosure movement and got to think deeply about property and why we treat so many things as commodities when they could be held in trust by communities in a commons-based approach. It not only offers many hypotheses and credible arguments to be hopefull about a 'future of abundance', but describes one major flaw in capitalistic thinking very well. The focus is on sharing and procuring access to goods, not owning them. There’s a new class of people who want to do things themselves instead of buying them. Hmm. In The Zero Marginal Cost Society, New York Times bestselling author Jeremy Rifkin describes how the emerging Internet of Things is speeding us to an era of nearly free goods and services, precipitating the meteoric rise of a global Collaborative Commons and the eclipse of capitalism. Read a quick 1-Page Summary, a Full Summary, or watch video summaries curated by our expert team. I have been reading about jobless growth, rise of robots, sustainable energy revolution all as disparate events shaping the world. Economic activity harnesses energy from natural resources to create goods. Rifkin uses the word “hacker” to refer only to the computer programmers who work selflessly for the common good. Your email address will not be published. Advertising prays on one’s sense of inadequacy and loneliness. the other kind of hacker. Unlike in the past, students are encouraged to question what they’ve learned. Mind blown. The Zero Marginal Cost Society, by Jeremy Rifkin New York Times 2014 In The Zero Marginal Cost Society, bestselling author Jeremy Rifkin, describes how the emerging Internet of Things is speeding us to an era of nearly free goods and services, precipitating the meteoric rise of a global Collaborative Commons and the eclipse of capitalism. Required fields are marked *. Human beings are not the egotistical, 'always out for nr 1.'